“Kintsugi”

“In Japan there is a kind of reverence for the art of mending. In the context of the tea ceremony there is no such thing as failure or success in the way we are accustomed to using those words. A broken bowl would be valued precisely because of the exquisite nature of how it was repaired, a distinctly Japanese tradition of kintsugi, meaning to “to patch with gold”. Often, we try to repair broken things in such a way as to conceal the repair and make it “good as new.” But the tea masters understood that by repairing the broken bowl with the distinct beauty of radiant gold, they could create an alternative to “good as new” and instead employ a “better than new” aesthetic. They understood that a conspicuous, artful repair actually adds value. Because after mending, the bowl’s unique fault lines were transformed into little rivers of gold that post repair were even more special because the bowl could then resemble nothing but itself. Here lies that radical physical transformation from useless to priceless, from failure to success. All of the fumbling and awkward moments you will go through, all of the failed attempts, all of the near misses, all of the spontaneous curiosity will eventually start to steer you in exactly the right direction.”
-Teresita Fernández, sculptor
quoted by Maria Popova in Brain Pickings

no images, no poetry

Reading a fly fishing magazine I came across an statement that stirs my heart strings:
 
“Their supposition is that [fly-fishing] is an admixture of aesthetics, philosophy, and science, and that by standing in cold water for a couple of hours you can communicate with your God (obviously not a bait fisherman). Certainly all these elements are present in the recreation, but they are important elements of all the better parts of life, not just fly-fishing.”-Herman Henkin, quoted in California Fly Fisher, August 2013.
 
I like to emphasize the they are important elements of all the better parts of life.”
Life is a synthesis of many aspects of living.
 
When there no new images or poetry. Or new books.