Change of pace

73849845-8E72-4B3D-B628-2A19D1D16578After a few days delay Mrs. Abstract and I finally drove up the mountains today. We were scheduled to leave on Monday but I did not feel well. I felt better last night. We brought a lot of food to limit trips to the grocery store and limit eating out in restaurants.

We will try to stay inside the condo. Walk and hike in the woods, reading and maybe writing. I play chess while Mrs. Abstract watch movies.

It’s quiet here in the mountains although when we arrived there were thunderstorms.

Books I am reading: Divine Comedy by Dante. Translated by Hollander & Hollander. I’m starting Roberto Bolaño 2666.

 

Decision

May be it’s to answer a call or blind fate in finding something

You decide to hike the Appalachian Trail.

The trail is kind to the brave and humble

The pain and sweat and determination

Stay with every step in solidarity with others.

To reach the summit the climb becomes steeper

You have to grab handholds firmly

And pull yourself up with steady upper body strength

In the thin air your heart has to persevere

Your legs gather the steps almost like forever

You do not lose sight of your stamina and purpose

Till a shout of triumphal gratitude.

 

You  are in your nineties now

Seldom mention the deep meaning of your accomplishment

You often smile when someone talks about hiking or a climb

You walk only two to three miles a day.

The Joy of Winter

My moment of the day is listening and reading  the story of two climbers: Brian Mann  & Emily Russell. Listen:here

Winter Joy: Breaking Tail in 15 Degrees

by Brian Mann & Emily Russell

“It might sound strange, but there’s something cool about being tested. We’re both tempted to turn back, but we’re also thrilled by the idea that we’re the only humans here. It’s a kind of love-hate thing.

“The thing I like is when a mountain surprises you and the mountain comes out on top,” Emily says. “That’s what happened today.”